The ability to freely express ourselves is a defining aspect of human happiness. Do you want to feel the happiness and satisfaction we derive from expressing ourselves freely? We can help you—check out Blake’s story.

Blake was an extraordinarily good cars salesman. Everyone agreed, he was the Wayne Gretzky of automobile sales. Even when he was in high school and working part-time at his dad’s used car lot, Blake consistently out-sold his older, fulltime colleagues.

By the time he’d enrolled in university to study psychology, Blake had earned enough money to buy his own home and two of the late model Porches he was so talented at selling. During his first year of study he continued to sell cars at a luxury car dealership, which allowed him to marry the beautiful young daughter of the owner. No one doubted that he was going to be a huge success.

But when I met Blake shortly after his 26th birthday, he was a broken man—emotionally shattered and physically exhausted. He’d dropped out of school during his final year and went through a bitter divorce, in which he lost his house, cars and all his savings.

“I couldn’t do it anymore, Guylaine. Everyone thought I was Mr. Super Salesman because I knew a lot about cars. . . but that wasn’t true. I knew about people, that’s why I wanted to study psychology: I knew what people wanted, and I knew what they thought they wanted—so it was easy to sell them expensive cars, even when they clearly couldn’t afford it. But it made me miserable—I wanted to help people, not take advantage of them or put them into impossible debt. But I couldn’t tell them take the bus, or go buy an inexpensive used car from my dad. My boss, my wife, my friends and my colleagues relied on me to make money. I was never able to tell them that wasn’t what I wanted to do. So I walked away from it all. It cost me everything I had and I still can’t explain what went wrong. My life is over, I’m a loser.”

After taking Blake’s handprints, I understood why he had kept silent about his feelings for so many years. There was no indication whatsoever of a Mercury line in his hand, which is evident in his “before” handprint. He had solid head and heart lines, representing a keen mind and generous heart, but they were stifled and suffocated without the support of Mercury, or any other minor line.

freedom-expression-power-mercury-line-print

In classical mythology, wing-footed Mercury was the messenger of the gods—his job was to make sure the immortals were able to readily communicate with each other. In the hand, the line of Mercury also represents communication—it reflects our ability to convey our needs, desires, dreams and ideas, and the happiness and satisfaction we derive from expressing ourselves freely.

A strong Mercury line tells us that we understand who we are and are comfortable within ourselves and in the world. Mercury enables us to explore the depths of our subconscious mind, develop our unique gifts and talents, and share them with the world.

Blake didn’t know who he was, although he was aware of who he wasn’t. He felt trapped, and had become so frustrated with his inability to express himself that, in an act of desperation, he had chosen to simply disappear from his life.

During a series of counseling sessions—during which I recommended daily meditation and breathing exercises—I convinced Blake that by changing his thoughts and outlook on life he could change the lines in his hand . . . he could leave his anguish and heartache behind, learn to express himself, and create a happy and fulfilling future.

After several months of coaching, I noticed the beginning of a Mercury line in Blake’s right palm—it signaled an awakening of his inner self, an awareness of who he was and what he was meant to do in life. Within a year Blake had developed a strong Mercury line, which is seen in his “after” handprint, indicating that he’d found the self-confidence and inner contentment needed to express himself effortlessly. He also developed a healthy Sun line, reflecting his new-found conviction, and a growing magnetism that quickly drew an amazing number of positive people and circumstances into his life.

Soon Blake returned to school and completed his psychology degree, he remarried, had two children, became a college lecturer and opened a private counselling practice with his new wife. Most importantly, he was happy.

The ability to freely express ourselves is a defining aspect of human happiness; without it, we are in danger of retreating into our own misery and develop a medley of physical and psychological illnesses. When we learn to communicate our dreams, ambitions and individuality, we can soar towards joy with the speed and ease of winged-Mercury.

You would like to develop you own Mercury line? Give me a call at 866-428-3799, or book a consultation by clicking here.

I would love to hear your comments on this story and answer any questions you have regarding your own Mercury line that I can include in future articles.

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